Back to School: How to support your child’s learning at home

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Children across the UK will soon be returning to primary school to enter into a new school year and some will be starting school for the first time. After the long summer break we have put together a checklist of ideas and ways to support your child’s development at home while furthering your understanding of what they are learning at school.

Showing interest

Play an active role in your child’s learning by asking questions about their day. You can find out information about what your child is learning by reading ‘The National Curriculum Key stages 1 and 2 framework document’, this can be accessed on www.gov.uk . This breaks down the programme of study for English, Mathematics, Science, Art and Design, Computing, Design and Technology, Geography, History, Languages, Music and Physical Education as well as outlining statutory requirements and guidance. This information will help you to ask relevant questions, plan learning trips and invest in educational resources. read more

What is Mathematics Mastery?

What is Maths Mastery?

Mastery approaches to teaching maths is a current hot topic within education. ‘Mastery’ means acquiring a deep, secure and transferable understanding of maths. Our Educational Product Development Coordinator and in-house teacher, Joanne Moore, has outlined the 3 main elements for developing ‘mastery’ (also the 3 aims in the National Curriculum for Maths):

  • Fluency: to develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • Reasoning:  to follow a line of enquiry, conjecture relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language.
  • Problem solving: to apply mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

‘Mastery’ is built gradually and, in order to acquire the skills to a deepened level, learning moves through three different stages (based on Bruner, 1960); concrete, pictorial and abstract. read more